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Ready-to-wear brand H&M accused of scamming knitwear designer Chet Lo

Independent knitwear designer Chet Lo accuses H&M of ripping his signature textured knits from his Cherish Waste collection

  • London-based Asian American Chet Lo is known for his highly textured knits
  • The designer slammed ‘a certain fast fashion brand’ that he says stole his designs
  • Designer Harris Reed has called out the Swedish brand for allegedly stealing designs
  • H&M has denied claims they plagiarized designs in their Cherish Waste Collection

An independent knitwear designer has accused H&M of plagiarism.

The Swedish clothing brand has been accused of trying to replicate signature highly textured knits from Chet Lo’s Cherish Waste collection.

London-based Asian-American designer Lo took to Instagram to air his grievance against “a certain fast fashion brand” copying his designs and “mass-producing them for profit”.

British-American designer Harris Reed also accused the brand of scamming Lo, sharing examples of similar H&M clothing similar to Instagram Stories.

Fashion watchdog Diet Prada shared the claim on Instagram, saying the brand often sells “designer knockoffs” and is among brands producing knitwear similar to Lo’s.

H&M denied copying the patterns, arguing that the 90s/00s-inspired collection features spiky knits similar to pieces that were popular at the time.

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Fast fashion brand H&M has been accused of plagiarizing the designs of independent knitwear designer Chet Lo, known for his heavily textured knits. Pictured, a model walks the runway at Lo’s show during London Fashion Week

Swedish clothing brand H&M have been accused of trying to replicate Chet Lo's highly textured knits in their Cherish Waste collection (pictured)

Swedish clothing brand H&M have been accused of trying to replicate Chet Lo’s highly textured knits in their Cherish Waste collection (pictured)

The London-based Asian-American designer launched his eponymous brand in 2020 during the pandemic

The London-based Asian-American designer launched his eponymous brand in 2020 during the pandemic

Taking to Instagram earlier this week, Lo wrote, “To everyone who contacted me recently about a certain fast fashion company copying my work.

“Usually I don’t really talk about these issues because I don’t like to give time to this negative side of the industry, but after this has happened several times, I feel like have something to say.”

“As a small brand and independent queer POC designer, I worked incredibly hard to produce something that was based on my heritage and facilitated something I felt I needed to say in the industry.”

The designer, who launched his eponymous brand in 2020 during the pandemic, said his designs are based on personal experience – which he says is reflected in his work.

The designer, who launched his eponymous brand in 2020 during the pandemic, said his designs are based on personal experience – something he says is reflected in his work

Lo took to Instagram to air his grievance against 'a certain fast fashion brand' copying his work and 'mass producing them for profit'

Lo took to Instagram to air his grievance against ‘a certain fast fashion brand’ copying his work and ‘mass producing them for profit’

British-American designer Harris Reed also accused the brand of scamming Lo, sharing examples of H&M clothing similar to Lo's on their Instagram stories.

British-American designer Harris Reed also accused the brand of scamming Lo, sharing examples of H&M clothing similar to Lo’s on their Instagram stories.

The designer continued, “These fast fashion companies routinely replicate the works of smaller, more creative designers, but ultimately authenticity, originality and creativity can never be duplicated.

‘My work is representative of my soul and I believe you can make a difference at the end of the day / Every piece ordered from my website is hand knitted with love and care and not mass produced just for profit .

“I believe in working in an ethical and beautiful way, which I hope my clients and you all can appreciate.”

Fellow designer Reed was quick to take to social media to support Lo, writing that “Copying a young queer designer who works harder than anyone I know is truly disgusting.”

Sharing the designers’ claims on Instagram, Diet Prada pointed out that while H&M’s pieces may recall 2000-era style, Lo’s innovation lies in the technique – entirely shaped and knitted by hand, unlike the formed originals. hot.

“H&M’s version seems to replicate the dimensional knitted textile with mass production techniques.”

Lo is pictured wearing one of his signature knitwear designs as he attends a party in London in February this year

Lo is pictured wearing one of his signature knitwear designs as he attends a party in London in February this year

The clothing brand denied copying Lo, insisting their designs were inspired by 90s music videos and interior design.

The brand said in a statement: “At H&M we don’t copy, we have our own in-house creative teams who design all of our collections. The Cherish Waste collection has many references from the 90s and 00s and back then spike knits were a big thing.

“Trends are global and can happen at the same time in different places, because many designers are inspired by the same things.

“Right now, the 90s and 2000s are generally trending in the fashion world where many designers are looking to the same origin.

“In this particular case, our inspiration for this collection can be found in music videos from the 90s as well as various interior designs.”⠀

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Hazel J. Edmonds

The author Hazel J. Edmonds