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Fashion: The Big Block Theory! – Hindustan Times

Color blocking simply means combining two or more color blocks in your set. Although the trend has returned, history suggests that it never really left. Dutch abstract painter Piet Mondrian’s color-blocking technique has always inspired fashion designers. In 1965, Yves Saint Laurent extended Mondrian’s work to his designs and created the iconic Mondrian collection, which included shift dresses applying Mondrian’s “neoplastic” rules of placing primary color blocks, black and shades of grey, and horizontal and vertical dividing lines.

London in the 1960s celebrated Mary Quant’s color-block mini-dresses. The 1970s continued to incorporate color blocking solids with small colorful prints or polka dots, as neon color blocking was all the rage in

the disco era of the 70s and 80s. Salman Khan’s color-block blazers in Hum Aapke Hai Koun are a good example of how it was used in the 90s in Bollywood.

“New Age Indians are tech-savvy; so they can surf, understand and implement new fashion trends in their wardrobe. It’s a pleasure to see Gen Z and Millennials playing with contrasting, complementary or analogous hues to stylize their everyday looks that weren’t accepted before,” says fashion designer Nida Mahmood.

Try the tetradic scheme

Go beyond the usual suspects

Use colors close to each other on the color wheel to make sure they blend well (Vidushi Gupta)

Deciphering the trend

Tetradic colors are two sets of complementary colors that face each other on the color wheel. For example, the Google, Microsoft, and eBay logos follow a tetradic pattern.

It is a very rich and vibrant color palette, which helps the designs to stand out. Keep in mind that the vividness of the colors involved can cause them to overwhelm if not carefully balanced.

Style to go

The formula consists of mixing four colors to create an overall look, but leaving one dominant color.

You don’t have to stick only to solid pieces when color blocking. It can also be layered over a printed knit or crochet blouse with shorts or can be paired with a pantsuit or plaid skirt. When layering a corset or shrug over your dress, choose one in a contrasting color, like Brandon Maxwell did for Spring 22. “There are warm, neutral, and cool tones in the color wheel. . You can start with a color of your choice and pair it with nearby colors on the color wheel to make sure the combination is safer and the colors blend well,” suggests designer Aaina Mahajan.

A similar palette

The company of three

Using similar and analogous shades is easy on the eyes and looks quite classy; Bralette by Michael Kors (Collective India); Skirt by Karl Lagerfeld; (India Collective); Belt bag by Tiger Marrón; Coat by Two Point Two; Shoes by H&M (Vidushi Gupta)

Deciphering the trend

An analogous color scheme is defined as a grouping of at least three neighboring shades on the color wheel: blue-violet, violet, red-violet or yellow-green yellow, yellow-orange, etc. The colors of leaves and fall foliage, leaves and plants in a forest, the sky and the ocean follow this pattern.

The safe bet is to follow Claude Monet’s color palette from the iconic Water Lilies series to stylize your look. It has all shades of greens, blues and purples with some red accents used for the flowers.

Style to go

Analogous colors have a natural flow because they share common properties. There is also a sense of harmony in this type of scheme since the colors are linked. Combine two to three neighboring colors with black or white as the highlight.

“I believe color blocking using bold colors goes really well together if you really want to make a strong statement; however, a subtle way to do this is to use similar and analogous hues such as turquoise with blue or green or green-yellow with green. It’s nice to look at and it looks quite classy,” says designer Rahul Mishra.

Team up with the Triad program

This is a triangle that you will definitely love

Color blocking used vertically creates an illusion of height. It can work wonders for short people; Zara pants and top; Jacket by Vidhi Wadhwani; Earrings by Amama; Belt bag by Tiger Marrón; Shoes by FILA (Vidushi Gupta)

Deciphering the trend

The triad colors are equidistant on the color wheel, forming a triangle.

Abstract Expressionist, in his Color Field paintings, Mark Rothko used a combination of orange and purple, giving the impression of infinity.

A warm orange with purple (think FedEx logo) with a hint of green completes the triangle, just like Gucci’s spring 2011 ready-to-wear collection.

Style to go

Color your ensemble purple with a complementary shade of orange, or take it easy by choosing one and accenting with the other. Choose one color for your clothes, then the other as a statement accessory; the coolest choices would be shoes, boots, or your bag.

“Color blocking used vertically creates an illusion of height. If we use a long block for the top, it’s easy to create the illusion of height. It can work wonders for shorter people,” says designer Nida Mahmood, adding, “Also, it’s high time to explore the princess line with color blocking because it gives the illusion of a beautiful curve to the body.

Classic chic & complementary

These color combinations are usually bold, which is why many sports teams use them!

Color blocking with contrasting shades is superb; Dress by Forever New; Cloak of Vidhi Wadhwani; Zara shoes (Vidushi Gupta)

Deciphering the trend

Complementary colors face each other on the color wheel. The two colors complement each other in contrast, allowing each to stand out.

Vincent Van Gogh, in his masterpiece Le Café de nuit, used the power of complementary colors, red and green, to heighten the visual effect.

Style to go

Yes, this bold combination of red and green can be worn this season. All you need is the right attitude. Throwing a fringed shrug over any soft, flowy figure will give you the look you want.

“Color blocking with contrasting shades looks great. Just complement it with white accessories and cool, icy makeup,” recommends celebrity stylist Isha Bhansali.

Coupling of contrasts

Too hot to handle

The best part about mixing and matching different colors is that you can create a new look every time; Corset and pants by Cinnamon Stitch; Jacket by Vidhi Wadhwani; Bag of Tiger Marrón; H&M shoes; Earrings by Soulful by Percy Visaria (Vidushi Gupta)

Deciphering the trend

Hot pink is a brighter shade of pink, introduced by surreal fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli, who made it her signature color. The yellow and yellow-green of the color wheel complement the pink.

Although Andy Warhol painted Marilyn Monroe in virtually every color combination, his “Pink Marilyn” screen print brought those fun pop colors into every fashionista’s wardrobe. The bright pink hue has appeared on the Spring/Summer 22 catwalks from Alexander McQueen to Dior to Versace, spilling over to pretty shelves for us to shop.

Style to go

Combine three to four fresh and vibrant shades from the Pop Art palette and use one or two colors to accentuate the look using a bold accessory like a handbag, pumps or jewelry.

“The best part about mixing and matching different colors in a set is that you can create a whole new look every time. Each piece of clothing can have a longer lifespan because you reinvent each piece in the associating with something,” says Nida Mahmood.

Try the kawaii of Harajuku street style

Pastels are very present here

The new generation is mature enough to mix colors to create statement looks; Dress and shorts by Two Point Two; Earrings by Soulful by Percy Visaria; Boots by Aldo (Vidushi Gupta)

Deciphering the trend

Kawaii (meaning “cute” in Japanese) is a Japanese street style that offsets bold designs with soft colors. They create an outfit base with creams, ballet pink, lavender, light green and baby blue and mix them with classic styles and pretty prints.

Style to go

Kawaii Harajuku style can be pulled off by layering prints or plaids with solid colors, clothes and accessories. You can use a printed top with solid color pants and an accessorized jacket with solid color belts or high boots.

“Our youth share and consume experiences in real time. They explore different high fashion, couture and street styles to create their own style guide. I feel like the new generation is mature enough to mix colors to create bold looks,” says designer Pallavi Singhi.

Take notes on Raza’s web

The artist offers a lot of inspiration

Any color-block look can be enhanced with the right accessories; Dress by House of Fett; Cloak by Soulful by Percy Visaria; Karl Lagerfeld bag (Collective India); Shoes by Melissa (Vidushi Gupta)

Deciphering the trend

Famous Indian artist SH Raza was an early expressionist and later abstract artist. His paintings show the beautiful use of shades like teal and turquoise with a hint of complementary rusty orange filled with geometric patterns.

Style to go

Aqua with just orange accents gives it a fresh and energetic look. This bold and dramatic color block is a runway favorite this season. A good example is designer Prabal Gurung’s color blocking of a teal shirt and orange overcoat in his Spring/Summer 22 collection. Accessorize the aqua A-line sheath with a rust orange bag and platforms for the perfect date.

Designer Rahul Mishra says, “Any color-block look can be enhanced with the right accessories. One can start by adding jewelry to the look while keeping in mind that it only complements the outfit and does not overwhelm the wearer.

From HT Brunch, May 21, 2022

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Hazel J. Edmonds

The author Hazel J. Edmonds