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For those who were less inclined to celebrate the Jubilee at the weekend (but were drinking for no reason anyway), walking around London was like a blinding house of horrors, narrowly avoiding the mirage of red, white and blue. . Flags, garlands, party hats and even tiny dog ​​clothes have been covered in the Union Jack to celebrate Lizzie’s 70 years on the throne.

It was all a bit sickening, as street parties, parades, bland cucumber sandwiches and enlarged photos of Royals were rammed into eyes, throats and every other orifice all weekend. Jubilating a jubilee for an institution so disconnected from the real world did not seem right to me. It’s good that you’re past the national retirement age, Liz – but as Stacey Solomon rightly put it, in a recently redone hot shot loose women: I would work hard if the country paid for me to have 12 houses and work really hard.

That said, Sunday’s closing parade saw several double-deckers mark each decade the Queen had reigned for. One such bus was the 1990s, where the hellish faces of the Cool Britannia years gathered on the upper deck and waved to passers-by: Naomi Campbell, Sam McKnight, Patsy Kensit and, tying them together, perhaps the most 90 of all Faces of the 90s, Kate Moss, wearing a John Galliano blazer slapped with the Union Jack flag, from the designer’s SS93 collection.

The Union Jack context is volatile. His story spans Tim Nice-but-Dim toffs, The Who, ’70s punks pierce through safety pins, the defining moment of Geri Halliwell and Cool Britannia, with sinister far-right overtones. But, recently, its status has kind of turned around, finding her way to modern pop culture icons like Stormzy who wore a Union Jack body armor for her 2019 Glastonbury headliner Dua Lipas Vivienne Westwood took to last year’s Brit Awards and designer duo Stefan Cooke’s Union Jack jumper in their SS22 collection.

On Depop, the online shopping mecca for Gen-Z, a quick search for Union Jack” evokes countless early 2000s sweaters, Dr Martens boots and DIY punk jeans. Where trends are so deeply rooted in 90s and Styles of the 2000s, maybe the Union Jack is just another stylistic homage to the hedonistic decade that none of them remember.

Patriotism is often considered a dirty word. But there’s nothing wrong with being patriotic: the UK has given birth to grime, Glastonbury, Jack Grealish and Tikka Masala – it’s the kind of patriotism we’re all for, and the one we’re all for. the Union Jack could perhaps represent. But take it slow and steady, wear it with a healthy dose of irony, and leave the bloody flags at home.

TJ Sidhu, Junior Editor

Hazel J. Edmonds

The author Hazel J. Edmonds